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EWB-Canada News

25 Aug

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Mapping EWBers in the Workplace

August 25, 2011 | By |

EWB is taking corporate engagement to the next level, but it can’t be done without a little help from you!

By answering the five questions HERE, we will be able to map where people are working across the country right now.

We all know that EWB has some of the most incredible people around, and a lot of them are also doing amazing work in companies across Canada. Right now we have no idea what companies have EWBers working there already, and we are thus missing out on one of the best value propositions possible “Support what your employees are already excited about!”.

Answering the five questions HERE is a quick and easy action that will directly help EWB raise more money and lower one of the biggest barriers to increasing our impact.

Thanks for your time!

 

24 Jun

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EWB Recruiting New African Program Staff

June 24, 2011 | By |

Engineers Without Borders Canada is yet again seeking bright, outstanding leaders to join our African Programs Staff (APS). Training and departure for the following positions will begin in mid-October 2011.

In Agriculture ~

Agriculture Value Chains
Position: Market Development Field Officer
Ghana, Zambia and potentially Tanzania

Market Development Project Manager
Ghana, Zambia and potentially Tanzania

Business Development Services
Business Growth Specialist
Potentially Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia

Public Sector Agriculture Development
Specialist in New Models for Impact
Ghana

Entrepreneuriat Rural Agricole (Français)
Agriculture Capacity Building Officer
Burkina Faso

In Water and Sanitation ~

Water and Sanitation
District Capacity Development and Decentralization Policy Analyst
Malawi

In Governance and Rural Infrastructure ~ 

Governance and Rural Infrastructure

District Capacity Development and Decentralization Policy Analyst
Ghana

Who can apply for these positions?

New graduates and professionals of any educational background are eligible to apply for this chance to use their skills to help change the way development is done. Evidence of prior leadership in one’s field or studies is an asset. The application process begins with a Personal Information Form, including one’s resume and personal language assessment, as well as essay-style application questions, and is followed by interviews with those selected.

It is important to note that all costs for training, travel, and living are provided by EWB. We understand that many recent graduates may be struggling under the burden of student loans and do not want this to prevent anyone from applying. We encourage these individuals to contact us before they have applied so that alternative means can be explored.

For more information on EWB projects in Africa and what characteristics EWB is looking for please see http://www.ewb.ca/en/whatyoucando/volunteer/longterm.html

What does it mean to be an APS?

These volunteer positions provide APS with incredible opportunities for professional growth as a social change leader, all while creating lasting impact in rural Africa. Being an APS means working with purpose, collaborating with African partners, and having a life-changing experience. EWB’s African Programs Staff are humble entrepreneurs that become powerful change agents working as part of a larger movement for Africa.

What do APS do?

All of EWB’s work is designed to help our local partner organizations do what they do better. Our APS add value to partners in a variety of ways including executing on project specific work, building management capacity, improving learning and accountability systems, increasing skills of field staff and creating stronger connections between different stakeholders.

See the Agriculture, Water and Sanitation, and Governance and Rural Infrastructure paragraphs below for specific projects that our APS have been working on and for details of their successes.

Where are APS working?

EWB is currently working in Ghana, Malawi, Burkina Faso, and Zambia, and with new projects in Tanzania and Kenya.

When do I need to apply? When do these positions begin and end?

Applications for all of the above positions are due on July 3rd, 2011. Within two to four weeks of this closing date, all applicants will be contacted and interviews with selected candidates will begin. Training and departure for these positions will begin in mid-October 2011. All positions require a minimum commitment of one year.

How do I get more information? How do I get involved?

· To apply, go ewb.ca/volunteer.

· For detailed information about the responsibilities and requirements specific to each available position, please see the attached documents.

· See http://my.ewb.ca/posts/86606/ for brief descriptions of the open roles.

· Send any questions you have to Sarah Grant at sarahgrant@ewb.ca

Creating Change in Agriculture Businesses

In Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia, EWB is investing in the agriculture sector – the main employer and export earner in most developing countries – as a way to unlock African prosperity. Historically, Western aid has focused on dispersing subsidized fertilizer, hybrid seeds, and machines, or purchasing products from farmers as a functioning private sector would. Regrettably, these efforts simply distort markets and prevent private sector growth. There is no reward for the innovation and risk required to work in the private sector, so the cycle continues. So EWB is addressing the underlying issues, working with existing organizations that have the ability to greatly impact the agricultural sector, fostering entrepreneurial, private sector growth and helping farmers develop new business skills. These organizations include – NGOs, private businesses, impact investors and major donors.

Driving Results in Water and Sanitation

EWB believes that the persistent water and sanitation challenges in Malawi, and in much of the rest of the developing world, are due to inefficient investment rather than lack of investment. EWB realizes that while drilling wells is an important part of the solution, it will never be long-term without a systemic approach. So EWB focuses on changing the system to support these outputs. One example is the creation of a simple water-point mapping and monitoring system that relies on coordination with existing government programs to get the data. In short, it identifies broken outputs, the places where new outputs are needed most and the best location for them (strong water supply). The water mapping system is now functioning in 11 out of 28 districts in Malawi with plans to expand countrywide. EWB is also working with the government and communities to create functioning business models for water delivery, then sharing their findings within the sector and with the national government, influencing change.

Having Impact in Governance and Rural Services

EWB believes in the potential of public services such as water, education, and agriculture extension and ensuring that people who aren’t yet well connected to markets can still get the support needed to grow their business and raise a healthy family. EWB is working with governments who are far ahead in terms of decentralization and minimized corruption (currently this work is happening in Ghana and Malawi). We work with them to continue the process of decentralization. We work with them to develop state of the art monitoring tools that can guide resource investment at all levels. We work with them to invest in their management and field services to ensure that the services provided are backed by talented leaders.

Become a part of this important work by applying for one of the unique new APS positions available in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania or Zambia.

18 Apr

By

Fair Trade Fortnight

April 18, 2011 | By |

What is Fair Trade Fortnight?

From Our Buddies Over at FairTrade Canada:

“It’s only the best time of the year for anyone who loves Fair Trade and wants to spread it like wildfire throughout Canada! It’s when everyone gets together to do fun stuff in support of Fair Trade, from big public events, to special promotions in stores, to quiet efforts at home.

So, because (a) Fair Trade is awesome, and (b) Canada has a brand new (and far prettier) Fairtrade certification mark, we’re issuing a challenge to all Canadians… we want YOU to get loud and proud about Fair Trade and “Show Off Your Label! from May 1-15.”

04 Feb

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EWB Accepting Applications Now For New African Programs Staff

February 4, 2011 | By |

EWB Grand River is excited to share the news that Engineers Without Borders is recruiting exceptional leaders to join the African Programs Staff (APS) in the following positions:

With the Agriculture Team (in Ghana and Zambia)

Agricultural Value Chains Team Market Development Field Officer 

Agricultural Value Chains Team Market Development Project Manager

African Business Development Team

With the Malawi Water and Sanitation Team

District Capacity Development and Decentralization Policy Analyst

Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) Leader

For detailed information about the responsibilities and requirements specific to each available position, please see the attached documents. Also see http://my.ewb.ca/posts/83112/ for brief descriptions of the open roles. (Please note that the application deadline has been extended to February 11th.)

How Can You Benefit From an EWB Placement?

An elite placement with EWB offers new graduates and professionals of any educational background the chance to use their skills to help change the way development is done – as an individual and as a part of a movement committed to sustainable solutions to poverty. These volunteer positions provide APS with incredible opportunities for professional growth as a social change leader, all while creating lasting impact in rural Africa. Being an APS means working with purpose, collaborating with African partners, and having a life-changing experience.

EWB’s African Programs Staff are humble entrepreneurs that become powerful change agents working as part of a larger movement for Africa.

In Ghana and Zambia, EWB is investing in the agriculture sector – the main employer and export earner in most developing countries – as a way to unlock African prosperity. Historically, Western aid has focused on dispersing subsidized fertilizer, hybrid seeds, and machines, or purchasing products from farmers as a functioning private sector would. Regrettably, these efforts simply distort markets and prevent private sector growth. There is no reward for the innovation and risk required to work in the private sector, so the cycle continues. So EWB is addressing the underlying issues, working with existing organizations that have the ability to greatly impact the agricultural sector, fostering entrepreneurial, private sector  growth and helping farmers develop new business skills.

EWB believes that the persistent water and sanitation challenges in Malawi, and in much of the rest of the developing world, are due to inefficient investment rather than lack of investment. EWB realizes that while drilling wells is an important part of the solution, it will never be long-term without a systemic approach. So EWB focuses on changing the system to support these outputs. One example is the creation of a simple water-point mapping and monitoring system that relies on coordination with existing government programs to get the data. In short, it identifies broken outputs, the places where new outputs are needed most and the best location for them (strong water supply). The water mapping system is now functioning in 11 out of 28 districts in Malawi with plans to expand countrywide. EWB is also working with the government and communities to create functioning business models for water delivery, then sharing their findings within the sector and with the national government, influencing change.

All of EWB’s work is designed to help our local partner organizations do what they do better. Our APS add value to partners in a variety of ways including executing on project specific work, building management capacity, improving learning and accountability systems, increasing skills of field staff and creating stronger connections between different stakeholders.

Become a part of this important work by applying for one of the unique new APS positions available in Malawi, Ghana or Zambia.

To apply, go to http://my.ewb.ca/volunteering/applications/. Applications are due on February 11th, 2011. All positions require a minimum commitment of one year.

All costs for training, travel and living are provided by EWB. EWB understands that many recent graduates may be struggling under the burden of student loans. Recent graduates are encouraged to contact EWB before submitting their APS application, so that alternative means can be explored.

For more information on EWB projects in Africa and what characteristics EWB is looking for, see http://www.ewb.ca/en/whatyoucando/volunteer/longterm.html.

Please send any questions you have about these opportunities to Robin Farnworth at projects@ewb.ca.

15 Nov

By

Advocacy Workshop Series

November 15, 2010 | By |

How can you influence our government to develop more effective foreign aid policies?
Does Canada actually live up to its international aid commitments?

Find out what you can do to advocate for more effective aid!

EWB Ottawa will be hosting a three-part series on how to create change within our government and make our foreign development aid more effective. No matter who you work for, this is useful information about how our government works, and the topics covered will apply to whichever cause fires you up. We’ll be focusing on aid effectiveness, but the material covered and the principles you will learn can be applied much more broadly. Here’s your chance to attend a modified version of the $1350 workshop civil government workers are exposed to at a dirt cheap price (as low as $5!).
You may attend one, two, or all three workshops, and pricing is set accordingly. Please visit the website for more details on registration costs.

Workshop 1: Is Canada’s aid effective?

Thursday, November 11 (6-9pm)

University of Ottawa: University Centre 207 (85 University Private, Room 207)

This workshop will explore where Canada stands on foreign aid, the various international commitments related to aid and how we can foster better aid effectiveness on the ground. The accountability, creativity, and transparency of Canada’s foreign aid will also be investigated.

 

Workshop 2: How Government Works

Saturday, November 20 and Sunday, November 21  (10-4pm)

Location T.B.D.

The highlight of the series is a  two-day workshop on how the Canadian government works. This is a modified version of the workshop for new public servants (with an original cost of $1,350) and will show how individuals and groups can create change within the Canadian government. Heavy emphasis will be placed on how the government is structured and the access points through which change within the government can be created. The workshop will explore the roles and actions of government entities, including the Prime Minister’s Office and the Privy Council Office, and the dynamics between a minister’s office and their associated department. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the central agencies, Cabinet, Parliament, and the courts. The major processes explained include yearly planning and estimates , the passage of a bill through Parliament, and the approval of Memoranda to Cabinet (MCs) and Treasury Board Submissions (TB Subs). This is one workshop you do not want to miss!!

This course does not offer the official text-book version of the system; it provides insights into the real workings of government in a lively and entertaining manner, using an array of photos, videos, and discussions. In particular, this version of the workshop will provide considerable time for answering your specific questions.

***Please note that a lunch break will be provided, but participants will be responsible for their own lunch. It is recommended that a lunch is brought. Refreshments and snacks will be offered throughout the day.

 

Workshop 3: Shop Day – Creating the Action Plan

Thursday November 25 (6-9pm) or Saturday November 27 (2-5pm)

Locations T.B.D.

This workshop will enable participants to apply the material learned from previous workshops to created an action plan for Advocacy in Ottawa. We recommend that you have previously attended the “How Government Works” workshop. Please note there is a choice in dates — please attend the day that works best for you.

For more info and to register visit http://ottawa.ewb.ca/advocacy

11 Nov

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Who’s coming to EWB National Conference 2011?

November 11, 2010 | By |

Hey Everyone ~

It’s EWB’s 10th anniversary and we’re having our biggest conference yet to celebrate in Toronto this January. For the past three weeks I was seconded to the conference team to build a website to generate some buzz about who’s coming to conference. Check it out here: http://my.ewb.ca/conference/who/.

Anyways, that’s my quick status update on the project I’ve been working, it’s been tons of fun and I hope you enjoy playing around with it!

I’m heading off to the West Africa Retreat in mere minutes – should be a great weekend.

Cheers,

Ben

15 Apr

By

EWB African Program Staff Applications Open

April 15, 2010 | By |

EWB’s African Program Staff (APS) are a group of exceptional people who have both a passion for creating change with the rural poor in Africa and incredible talent for thinking about development and determining how to make progress on some of the globe’s most intractable problems. Does this describe you? If it does EWB Canada is currently recruiting candidates to join the APS team for departure in Fall 2010 and Winter 2011.

Applications, which are due April 30, 2010, can be found here.

EWB Canada currently works in Ghana, Burkina Faso, Malawi and Zambia to help the rural poor improve their livelihoods and climb out of poverty. Our areas of focus are:

  1. Agricultural value chains;
  2. Water, sanitation and hygiene promotion; and
  3. Planning and rural infrastructure for good governance (only in Ghana).

We work with local partner organizations to help them do what they do better, adding value in a variety of ways:

  • executing on project specific work;
  • building management capacity;
  • improving learning and accountability systems;
  • increasing skills of field staff; and
  • creating stronger connections between different stakeholders.

An APS position with EWB offers professionals and new graduates of any educational background a unique opportunity to contribute to development in rural Africa.  You will use your skills to help change the way human development is approached, both as an individual and as a part of a movement committed to making poverty history.

On a personal note, I found my 4 month, EWB Junior Fellow placement in Ghana in 2005 to be a life changing experience.  I was pushed on both emotional and intellectual dimensions and built connections that will stay with me for a lifetime. Based on this experience, and with a great desire  to once again seek out opportunity for challenge and impact, I recently applied for an APS position with EWB and will be returning to Africa in this role starting in August, 2010.  I encourage you to join me on this adventure by applying to become an APS as well.  You will grow in leaps and bounds as you discover, with EWB’s help, your potential and build skills that will stay with you for your life time. Most importantly, you will work with purpose and contribute to a better world, alongside your African partners.

APS terms run for 12 or 20+ months, with many APS staying on for over 2 years.  All costs for training, travel, and living are provided by EWB. However, if you are an interested recent graduate with outstanding student loan concerns, contact us to explore alternative arrangments before you apply.

Applications are due April 30th, 2010 at midnight. This is the final application round for Fall 2010 and the first of two application rounds for Winter 2011.  For more information on EWB projects in Africa and desired qualities of APS staff, please visit this link.

If you have any further questions,  or would like to discuss this opportunity further, you can:

  • Post a comment below;
  • Contact me, Alyssa Lindsay, here; or
  • Contact Robin Farnworth, EWB’s Director of Overseas Sending

01 Mar

By

A Year of Impact: Engineers Without Borders’ 2009 Annual Report

March 1, 2010 | By |

Part financial review, part story telling, the 2009 Engineers Without Borders-Canada Annual Report was released today.

“I am proud to share [this report],” says EWB-Canada co-CEO, George Roter. “In [these] pages, you will read stories about our work and impact, both in rural Africa and right here at home in Canada.”

These stories include ones like that from northern Ghana, where the Asongtaaba farmer group struggled to grow enough food to feed their families. In 2009, EWB-Canada volunteers and partner organizations helped implement the Agriculture as a Business program, which helped the farmers gain business skills and opportunities to run profitable farms.

“The transformation has been truly remarkable,” says Roter. “The farmers have earned a steady stream of profits; so much so, that our volunteers recently told me that they opened a bank account to save for future investment in their farms.”

The Asongtaaba group represents just one of 130 farmer groups – 2,100 farmers in total – who are now thriving, in part due to EWB-Canada’s help in 2009.  To read more stories like these, and to learn how EWB-Canada is working to help build a more prosperous future for rural Africans, follow this link to the report. To view the 2009 financial statements, click here.