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Africa

25 Aug

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Buy from Africa – Chapter Fundraiser

August 25, 2011 | By |

Thanks to Chad Hamre, former overseas volunteer, CEO of Ethical Ocean and all around awesome guy, we have a new tool for chapter fundraising and trading fairly with Africa all in a one-two punch.

Ethical Ocean has curated 180 African made and sourced products from 9 different social businesses on a page dedicated to EWB fundraising at http://www.ethicalocean.com/ewb-fundraising

From now until August 31, 10% of all sales from the page will go to our chapter. All you have to do is list Grand River in the order comments.

Challenge yourself to buy from Africa! Please share the link with your friends and consider some early holiday shopping or a gift for an upcoming occasion.

10 Jun

By

The World Of EWB

June 10, 2011 | By |

If you haven’t yet checked out the fascinating and informative (and often entertaining, enlightening or quirky) blogs being written by EWB’s overseas staff and volunteers, it is high time!

From the World of EWB “about” page:

This website brings together the blogs of Engineers Without Borders-Ingénieurs Sans Frontières Canada’s staff and volunteers.

Working in Malawi, Ghana, Burkina Faso, Zambia, and Canada, these exceptional people are building the opportunities and capacities of rural Africans by working with local development organizations and increasing their effectiveness. Find out more about EWB’s work here.

Please note that the blogs represent the personal opinions of the writers only, and not the official beliefs or policies of EWB or its partner organizations.

05 May

By

Can the World Feed 10 Billion People?

May 5, 2011 | By |

Our top pick from the web this month is from the Argument column of Foreign Policy journal, May 4th 2011
Check out Raj Patel’s informative and thought-provoking new article:  Can the World Feed 10 Billion People?

“With an exploding global population — and Africa’s numbers set to triple — the world’s experts are falling over themselves arguing how to feed the masses. Why do they have it so wrong?”

31 Mar

By

Strategy Development in Small Meal-Sized Chunks

March 31, 2011 | By |

What am I doing here? Thoughts from an agricultural development gal in Ghana

Here’s another good update from Erin’s blog, reposted here with her kind permission:

Hello world,

I’m writing this post to introduce a new concept we want to try over here at EWB. I’ve been hanging out in the “international development/aid online community” for a while now and while it’s fun to chat, I’d actually like to put this community to work! (And yes, family, friends and colleagues, I want you to help me out too!) One of the favourite conversation topics is poorly designed development projects. While it’s fun to bash these projects, it’s harder to design good ones. I’d like to use this opportunity to seek out feedback on our team’s next move in public sector agricultural development.

This is an experiment! The plan is to outline our team’s strategy development process and the various investment opportunities we have, then seek external feedback on where we can invest and how we can play a bigger role in the agric sector. I have no idea if this experiment will work out, but I think it will be interesting to try! In order to work, it relies on a few success factors:

  • lots of readers – so please share widely so we can ask for widespread feedback!
  • feedback from within and outside the sector – if you know people in the agric development sector, send them this way. If you know smart people who would just be interested in providing feedback, please also send them this way!
  • sustained readership – unfortunately there is a lot of info, so it’ll be going up in a series of posts – you gotta keep reading to get to the meat! We’ll see whether people can hang in this long.
  • understandable posts – we’re looking for feedback on whether you have any idea what we’re talking about… so let us know!

As I wrote in a previous post, our team is currently undergoing a rigorous strategy development process. Thanks to Ben‘s personal interest in the tech start-up world, we’re trying something very new: applying start-up business principles to our strategy development. For a bit of background on why we’re applying these principles, see Ben’s earlier post, Tech start-ups and human development: different worlds?. Ben will introduce you to the tech-world language, but it basically advocates a Searcher rather than a Planner mentality – figuring out what people want before scaling it to a broad level.

Ben will be writing a series of blog posts in the next few weeks describing our process, model and some of the initiatives we’re looking to invest in. I’ll post links here on my blog, but please comment over on his blog – we’re hoping to get tons of feedback and discussions going!

So, without further ado, I will guide you to the first post over on Ben’s blog: Strategy Development in Small-meal-sized Chunks.  Enjoy!

10 Mar

By

The Africa Portal

March 10, 2011 | By |

The Africa Portal is an online knowledge resource for policy-related issues on Africa.

“An undertaking by the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), Makerere University (MAK), and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), the Africa Portal offers open access to a suite of features including an online library collection; a resource for opinion and analysis; an experts directory; an international events calendar; and a mobile technology component—all aimed to equip users with research and information on Africa’s current policy issues.

A key feature to the Africa Portal is the online library collection holding over 3,000 books, journals, and digital documents related to African policy issues. The entire online repository is open access and available for free full-text download. A portion of the digital documents housed in the library have been digitized for the first time as an undertaking of the Africa Portal project. Facilitating new digitization projects is a core feature of the Africa Portal, which aims to improve access and visibility for African research.

The Africa Portal is part of the Africa Initiative project.”  (All text above is from Africa Portal About page.)

Explore the Opinion/Analysis page for some thought-provoking commentary and very useful background information.

05 Mar

By

African Programs Staff Positions Open !

March 5, 2011 | By |

Could This Exciting Opportunity Be Calling You ?

From Erin Flinton ~

Dear Members,

I am very excited to announce that EWB is yet again recruiting exceptional leaders to join our African Programs Staff (APS). Departure for the following positions begins in July 2011, but the positions are also available for November 2011:

In Agriculture

Team Position Location
 Agriculture Value Chains Market Development Field Officer Ghana, Zambia and potentially Tanzania
Market Development Project Manager Ghana, Zambia and potentially Tanzania
Business Development Services Business Growth Specialist Potentially Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia
Ministry of Food and Agriculture Agriculture Extension Research and Capacity Development Officer Ghana
Entrepreneuriat Rural Agricole (Français) Agriculture Capacity Building Officer Burkina Faso

In Water and Sanitation

Team Position Location
Water and Sanitation District Capacity Development and Decentralization Policy Analyst Malawi

 

In Governance and Rural Infrastructure

Team Position Location
Governance and Rural Infrastructure District Capacity Development and Decentralization Policy Analyst Ghana

 –

For detailed information about the responsibilities and requirements specific to each available position, please see the attached documents. Also see http://my.ewb.ca/posts/84661/ for brief descriptions of the open roles.

An elite placement with EWB offers new graduates and professionals of any educational background the chance to use their skills to help change the way development is done – as an individual and as a part of a movement committed to sustainable solutions to poverty. These volunteer positions provide APS with incredible opportunities for professional growth as a social change leader, all while creating lasting impact in rural Africa. Being an APS means working with purpose, collaborating with African partners, and having a life-changing experience.

EWB’s African Programs Staff are humble entrepreneurs that become powerful change agents working as part of a larger movement for Africa.

Creating Change in Agriculture

In Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia (Tanzania and Kenya added this year), EWB is investing in the agriculture sector – the main employer and export earner in most developing countries – as a way to unlock African prosperity. Historically, Western aid has focused on dispersing subsidized fertilizer, hybrid seeds, and machines, or purchasing products from farmers as a functioning private sector would. Regrettably, these efforts simply distort markets and prevent private sector growth. EWB is addressing the underlying issues by working on two problems – helping farmers access markets and market development. To help farmers access markets we are working with Ministries of Food and Agriculture and existing farmers’ unions to provide support and information access to rural farmers. To develop markets, we work with progressive non-government organizations that are fostering private sector growth and directly with the small and medium sized businesses to help them grow and increase the number of small-scale farmers they support.  In addition to working with government, non-government and the private sector on the ground we are partnering with donors, becoming part of the donor chain to more easily share field realities and drive change at scale.

Driving Results in Water and Sanitation

EWB believes that the persistent water and sanitation challenges in Malawi, and in much of the rest of the developing world, are due to inefficient investment rather than lack of investment. EWB realizes that while drilling wells is an important part of the solution, it will never be long-term without a systemic approach. EWB focuses on changing the system to support these outputs. Beyond EWB’s creation of a simple water-point mapping and monitoring system to address this issue, the Water and Sanitation Team is also working with the government and communities to create functioning business models for water delivery, then sharing their findings within the sector and with the national government, influencing change.

Having Impact in Governance and Rural Infrastructure

In Ghana, public services, such as clean water from wells and hand pumps, reliable roads for food transport, and schools for youth, are hard to come by or have limited access. EWB is testing new approaches to evidence-based planning and developing strong decision-makers to address the root causes of this widespread infrastructure failure in Ghana. EWB volunteers are working in conjunction with local government partners to identify relevant data for decision making, to develop centralized data systems, and to analyze trends to get a better picture of where infrastructure is needed most. Rural districts can now, therefore, prioritize clean water, education, transportation, and healthcare work based on tangible data. Furthermore, EWB volunteers are testing new approaches to involve communities in planning decisions in order to better hold leaders accountable; they have also developed a mentorship program matching experienced planners with district level staff to expand the quality of planning capability at the district level.

All of EWB’s work is designed to help our local partner organizations do what they do better. Our APS add value to partners in a variety of ways including executing on project specific work, building management capacity, improving learning and accountability systems, increasing skills of field staff and creating stronger connections between different stakeholders.

Become a part of this important work by applying for one of the unique new APS positions available in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania or Zambia.

To apply, go to ewb.ca/volunteerApplications are due on April 8th, 2011. All positions require a minimum commitment of one year.

All costs for training, travel, and living are provided by EWB. We understand that many recent graduates may be struggling under the burden of student loans. We encourage these individuals to contact us before they have applied so that alternative means can be explored.

For more information on EWB projects in Africa and what characteristics EWB is looking for, please see http://www.ewb.ca/en/whatyoucando/volunteer/longterm.html.

Send any questions you have to Sarah Grant at sarahgrant@ewb.ca 

20 Feb

By

What am I doing here? A Bitter Pill

February 20, 2011 | By |

Update From The Field

Grand River chapter’s Erin Antcliffe, one of EWB’s hardworking African program staff, has posted a frank and informative new entry in her blog (February 17th 2011).  You can read it here, or on Erin’s own site “What am I doing here?   Thoughts from an agricultural development gal in Ghana.”

As I near the 1-year mark of my work in Ghana with EWB, I’d like to reflect back on what has happened over the last year. We embark on these jobs and journeys with the hope of making the world a better place, of somehow contributing to “international development”. However, I’m forced to acknowledge that it’s unlikely that anything I’ve done in the past year has directly improved the lives of poor Ghanaians, and that is a bitter pill to swallow.

I know, that sounds really negative. But believe me, it’s not all bad! There are different types of impact we can have – from short-term, direct and focused to long-term, indirect and widespread. My direct impact this year was limited, but I’ve had impact in other ways. So please bear with me as I get to the end of this post – there is a happy ending!

   Maize farmer

2010 was a rough year for our team, alternately known as Team MoFA, Rural Agriculture Ghana or Agribusiness Ghana (we still don’t seem to have settled on a universal name). When I arrived last March, the team was undergoing a rocky Team Leader transition, which inevitably led to a short dip in team productivity. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to fully recover from the dip, and the new Team Leader stepped down in January, leaving a vacant place at the head of our team. We also went from being a 9-person team, when I arrived in March, to the current 4-person team – a huge loss of resources. Most of this was just due to people’s contracts being up and not enough new volunteers to fill their places, but it will still take some time to rebuild our numbers.

In terms of strategy, we haven’t seen as much success as we hoped with the Agriculture As a Business program (for more details on the challenges, please see my previous post). The political and systemic barriers in the Ministry of Agriculture are too imposing to lead a significant change in extension from the ground up, and we’ve been unable to influence the right people at the top. Volunteers in districts were getting demotivated by barriers that were out of their control, and all the high-level talk about mobilizing farmer groups didn’t materialize into any concrete changes in the sector (policies, funding, etc.) .

We had an amazing group of Junior Fellows (students) from EWB join us in the summer, but they experienced many of the same challenges. They achieved a few fabulous short-term successes, yet on the whole were unable to institutionalize the Agriculture As a Business program in any of their Ministry of Agriculture district offices. We concluded that our current pathway for scaling the Agriculture As a Business program was ineffective and decided to reallocate resources to address district management challenges. A few Professional Fellows experimented in this domain, with varying degrees of success in individual initiatives, such as improving staff meetings, management styles, collecting feedback and time management strategies. But none of these initiatives promised the transformational change that we want to see in the way the Ministry of Agriculture is run from the top.

The one successful initiative I participated in this year was the DDA (District Director of Agriculture) Fellowship, a management and leadership program. It was a success in the sense that all the DDAs loved it, and tried to apply what they learned in the management of their districts. However, it’s really tricky to know whether this has trickled down to the extension staff and actually improved the work they’re doing in the field, with farmers. This is definitely more of a long-term change, a culture shift that will gradually result in improved staff performance. But evaluating these types of programs is really tricky, and attribution is very difficult, so… who knows??

The only direct impact I’ve probably had on poor Ghanaian farmers is through my personal interactions with my host family and friends in the village. I’ve treasured these interactions and really tried to be a good role model and influence. However, I’ve been hesitant to provide any form of material aid, beyond a few Christmas presents that I brought back from Canada, for fear that it will change the nature of our relationship. I did support the local women’s shea butter production group by buying 200 bars of soap to take back to Canada (it’s great stuff!), so I guess that cash injection probably made a small difference. But is that really the type of work I came here to do? No…

Zuo Women’s Group, producers of high quality shea butter soap

A few things I’ve learned in the past year:

  • As much as we talk about effective program design, its often the operational capacity of an organization that is the bottleneck to achieving success: it’s amazing how much time and energy can be spent on just making a team function. I have great admiration for excellent managers, admin and support staff who, if they’re doing their job well, you don’t even really notice in your day-to-day work.
  • It is unrealistic to achieve widespread impact in 1 year: we need to break 1-year placements down into specific “learning” or “doing” chunks so volunteers realize they’ve contributed something meaningful. For example, if we’re trying to make a big change in technology adoption through agricultural extension, a 1-year volunteer should have a mandate such as “learn about tech adoption techniques outside of the public sector in Ghana” or “pilot one new tech adoption approach with extension agents in your district and prepare a report with your recommendations for the team strategy going forward”. If they hit on a genius idea, great – we’ll scale it! (if there’s a scaling mechanism). If it doesn’t work, also great! share your learning and how we should change our approach in the next iteration of the strategy.
  • Effective interventions (or inventions) only matter if there is a way to scale them (or sell them): you might have the greatest idea in the world, but it doesn’t matter if no one sees it. Transformative change needs to reach scale, one way or another!
  • Perspective matters: even if you DO know what needs to be done, on the ground, to make a significant improvement to the lives of those living in poverty, you need to find a way of framing it so that it matters to those making the change, from the bottom (field staff) to the top (policy-makers). Just providing evidence to support your case is not enough; you must account for political, historical and social implications as well.
  • Field realities are valued: EWB gets a lot of street cred for being “in the field” or “on the ground”, working in districts (not the most glamourous of job locations). We need to find better channels for sharing these field realities with those higher up the chain of command. (Suggestions?)
  • Opportunity cost: there will always be more opportunities than you can take advantage of, the hard part is gambling on which opportunities will be most worth your time in the end.
  • BONUS EWB lesson: it’s ok to fail, as long as you LEARN and CHANGE as a result! (check out http://admittingfailure.com for EWB’s recent initiative on encouraging learning from failure in the NGO world)

Now, as we peer out at 2011 with a couple months already in our pocket, our team is forced to admit that we’re not achieving as much as we’d like. While we can’t categorize the Agriculture As a Business program as a failure, since it IS an effective tool for building farmer groups and developing business skills, it’s not quite a success either, since we can’t get the Ministry of Agriculture to adopt it at the scale needed to achieve widespread change.

     Hakim – a future farmer?

There has been a lot of talk about failure recently, and encouragement for NGOs to admit failure when it happens. But this is a clear example where the situation is not black or white, failure or success – but rather grey. In our team’s collective experience in Ghana, a lot of other NGOs/projects at this point would keep lauding their programs as successes and putting more and more resources into them. Instead, we want to acknowledge our lukewarm progress and shift to where we can have white hot results instead. It’s frustrating for our staff to keep banging our heads against the wall in a program that’s going against the flow of the current agricultural sector trends. We’re not giving up on this program; but until the stars align to facilitate the widespread changes that are needed (district autonomy, decentralization, performance incentives, etc.) it is more effective for us to invest our energy in other places.

We’ve now been working with districts in the Ministry of Agriculture in Ghana for 6 years. We’ve met a lot of key players, we understand the system, we’ve seen lots of challenges and we’ve built strong relationships. We’ve tried a few things, with varying degrees of success, but nowhere near the scale of change we want to create. Now we have a bunch of cool ideas, but we have no idea which one is going to work. In the spirit of complexity, we’re not going to throw all our eggs in one basket; instead, we’re going to explore the change potential of a number of different initiatives and gauge the reaction of those in the Ministry of Agriculture and in the wider agricultural development sector. I’ll be blogging more about this strategy development process as it unfolds, so you can all follow along with me!

Back to that bitter pill: my underwhelming personal success. Is this the kind of year I wanted? Of course not. Has it been a waste of time? Heeeellllll NO! I have learned SO much valuable information over the past year that will allow me to position myself to create the change I want in the coming 2 years.

You might think I’m demotivated. That I’m frustrated by the pace of change and our inability to see any real impact. That I’m ready to throw in the towel and truck back home to an easier job in Canada. But you’d be wrong! Strangely enough, I’m more motivated than ever! Something about being faced with so many challenges at once has really sparked a fire in me. I’m excited to drive the team in new directions, to get us excited about what’s next and to build ourselves up into an impactful, influential team of agric superstars! Seeing the passion and dedication of my fellow teammates has forced me to find renewed resources of energy in myself. I can’t wait to see where we go next.

04 Feb

By

EWB Accepting Applications Now For New African Programs Staff

February 4, 2011 | By |

EWB Grand River is excited to share the news that Engineers Without Borders is recruiting exceptional leaders to join the African Programs Staff (APS) in the following positions:

With the Agriculture Team (in Ghana and Zambia)

Agricultural Value Chains Team Market Development Field Officer 

Agricultural Value Chains Team Market Development Project Manager

African Business Development Team

With the Malawi Water and Sanitation Team

District Capacity Development and Decentralization Policy Analyst

Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) Leader

For detailed information about the responsibilities and requirements specific to each available position, please see the attached documents. Also see http://my.ewb.ca/posts/83112/ for brief descriptions of the open roles. (Please note that the application deadline has been extended to February 11th.)

How Can You Benefit From an EWB Placement?

An elite placement with EWB offers new graduates and professionals of any educational background the chance to use their skills to help change the way development is done – as an individual and as a part of a movement committed to sustainable solutions to poverty. These volunteer positions provide APS with incredible opportunities for professional growth as a social change leader, all while creating lasting impact in rural Africa. Being an APS means working with purpose, collaborating with African partners, and having a life-changing experience.

EWB’s African Programs Staff are humble entrepreneurs that become powerful change agents working as part of a larger movement for Africa.

In Ghana and Zambia, EWB is investing in the agriculture sector – the main employer and export earner in most developing countries – as a way to unlock African prosperity. Historically, Western aid has focused on dispersing subsidized fertilizer, hybrid seeds, and machines, or purchasing products from farmers as a functioning private sector would. Regrettably, these efforts simply distort markets and prevent private sector growth. There is no reward for the innovation and risk required to work in the private sector, so the cycle continues. So EWB is addressing the underlying issues, working with existing organizations that have the ability to greatly impact the agricultural sector, fostering entrepreneurial, private sector  growth and helping farmers develop new business skills.

EWB believes that the persistent water and sanitation challenges in Malawi, and in much of the rest of the developing world, are due to inefficient investment rather than lack of investment. EWB realizes that while drilling wells is an important part of the solution, it will never be long-term without a systemic approach. So EWB focuses on changing the system to support these outputs. One example is the creation of a simple water-point mapping and monitoring system that relies on coordination with existing government programs to get the data. In short, it identifies broken outputs, the places where new outputs are needed most and the best location for them (strong water supply). The water mapping system is now functioning in 11 out of 28 districts in Malawi with plans to expand countrywide. EWB is also working with the government and communities to create functioning business models for water delivery, then sharing their findings within the sector and with the national government, influencing change.

All of EWB’s work is designed to help our local partner organizations do what they do better. Our APS add value to partners in a variety of ways including executing on project specific work, building management capacity, improving learning and accountability systems, increasing skills of field staff and creating stronger connections between different stakeholders.

Become a part of this important work by applying for one of the unique new APS positions available in Malawi, Ghana or Zambia.

To apply, go to http://my.ewb.ca/volunteering/applications/. Applications are due on February 11th, 2011. All positions require a minimum commitment of one year.

All costs for training, travel and living are provided by EWB. EWB understands that many recent graduates may be struggling under the burden of student loans. Recent graduates are encouraged to contact EWB before submitting their APS application, so that alternative means can be explored.

For more information on EWB projects in Africa and what characteristics EWB is looking for, see http://www.ewb.ca/en/whatyoucando/volunteer/longterm.html.

Please send any questions you have about these opportunities to Robin Farnworth at projects@ewb.ca.